MISSED OUR LATEST SHOW? Podcasts of The Women's Eye Radio Show are NOW available on iTunes. Check them out and if you like, leave us a review. Click Here
 

Stories by Pamela Burke

About Pamela Burke

TWE Podcast: Catherine Anaya Talks Self-Confident Kids with Karen Shell and Money Protection with Catherine Scrivano

Catherine Anaya, Karen Shell,and Catherine Scrivano

Catherine Anaya, Karen Shell,and Catherine Scrivano

By Catherine Anaya/October 9, 2019

Don’t miss a BRAND NEW episode of The Women’s Eye podcast with Catherine Anaya as I talk with Karen Shell. She is the founder and executive director of Kids in Focus, a nonprofit organization that gives at-risk youth a camera, a mentor and new lens on life with skills that foster self-confidence and empowerment.

Karen started mentoring at-risk children in the early 1990’s. For 20 years, she worked with kids and their families in various volunteer and mentoring roles. Her passion stemmed from her own childhood experiences that were similar to the children she served.

Karen Shell with Kids in Focus/Photo: Scott Hays

Karen Shell with Kids in Focus/Photo: Scott Hays

I talk with Karen about the difference she noticed in the children she worked with and how she believes her whole life has been about preparing her to create Kids in Focus.

Karen at Kids in Focus photo event/Phoenix

Plus, Karen will share how Kids in Focus is poised for explosive growth and how you can help.

Also in this episode, you’ll meet a regular contributor to The Women’s Eye podcast, Catherine Scrivano.

Catherine Scrivano and host Catherine

Catherine Scrivano and host Catherine

Catherine is President of CASCO Financial Group in Phoenix, Arizona. She founded her business to help people create the financial strength necessary for achieving their dreams and Building Money Power.

In this episode she talks about the importance of having a personal document locator (below) and why it should be shared with loved ones who may need to settle your affairs someday.

Personal Document Locator from Catherine Scrivano

Plus, Catherine and her CASCO Financial Group is kindly providing that document to you, for free! Thanks, Catherine!

Click HERE to download it now.

For more information about Karen and Kids in Focus, check out:

Website: http://kidsinfocus.org
Instagram: @kidsinfocus
Facebook: @KidsNFocus
Twitter: @kidsinfocusphx

Kayden,  Kids in Focus | Karen Shell

Kayden,  Kids in Focus

Michelle, Kids in Focus | Karen Shell

Michelle, Kids in Focus

###

TWE Interview: Journalist Zahra Hankir Spotlights Arab Women Reporters In Their Own Words

London-based journalist, Zahra Hankir has covered Mid East and Arab political turmoil and violence throughout her career but admittedly not to the detriment of her safety. She was well aware that many women journalists, who live in and report from those diverse regions, face unbelievable odds to get the truth out yet was shocked to notice they received little credit.

Zahrir Hankir/Photo: Daniel Gardine

Zahrir Hankir/Photo: Daniel Gardiner

London-based journalist, Zahra Hankir has covered Mid East and Arab political turmoil and violence throughout her career but admittedly not to the detriment of her safety. She was well aware that many women journalists, who live in and report from those diverse regions, face unbelievable odds to get the truth out yet was shocked to notice they received little credit. Zahra stepped up to change that.

I was fascinated by information gathering and dissemination and the idea that the pursuit of truth and its reflection could be a profession. My obsession with journalism and the Arab world persisted over the years, and it culminated in this book.

In Our Women on the Ground, Zahra asked 19 courageous reporters to share the powerful, unvarnished perspectives on their jobs and lives. Zahra took time with me to describe the importance of these journalists, known as sahafiya…

EYE: What is your goal in highlighting Arab and Mideastern women journalists?

ZAHRA: To give Arab women reporters a global platform to share their experiences of reporting from and living in the region from which they hail.

The Arab world and its people are so often seen as homogeneous, when the geographic area is intricately layered, and each woman and country and conflict carries unique truths.

This is also a long overdue act of celebration and appreciation for the incredible work that these women have been doing on the ground over the decades, amidst seismic societal shifts and widespread displacement triggered by violent warfare and its crippling aftermath.

EYE: How dangerous is the work?

ZAHRA: Local, Arab women often risk their lives at the frontlines as they cover their home or neighboring countries, and haven’t historically been celebrated in this way and in these spaces. These women are not war correspondents or foreign reporters.

These journalists, correspondents and photographers are natives who tell different, more personal stories about conflict and its devastating consequences on their own people.

The women also face steep and unique challenges that their Western counterparts do not. With all that in mind, their stories can’t but be fascinating, and their work can’t but be celebrated.

EYE: Why did you decide to compile their stories through personal essays and not interviews?

ZAHRA: I wanted the women in this book to tell their stories sans filters, and without any specific audience in mind, Western or otherwise. I acted as a guide, when I was needed, and I did indeed edit and curate the book and make editorial suggestions along the way.

I ultimately hoped that they would tell whatever story felt most poignant to them, and wanted them to be ready to tell that story. Looking at how the essays turned out — their range; the raw, intimate details they contain; and the honesty with which they were written — I do believe this was the right approach.

EYE: Were you surprised by any of the essays?

ZAHRA: It’s not that I didn’t expect the women to write openly and honestly, but I was, on occasion, knocked sideways by the extent to which they used their pens to open up and to excavate previously unearthed feelings.

I was in constant awe of their bravery, and their willingness to push boundaries without even intending to do so.

Zaina Erhaim, a Syrian journalist, for example, writes about how she had become so desensitized to violence in her hometown, that one day, as she wiped blood off her car following a bombing at a nearby school, she called her friend and casually asked her what they should have for lunch that day.

Nada Bakri, a former journalist from Lebanon, wrote for the first time about the grief she endured after she lost her husband, Anthony Shadid, during the Arab Spring — there is no resolution in that chapter, no happy ending, no hopeful thread. The end of the essay is something of a gutpunch.

EYE: Why did you choose this format?

ZAHRA: It doesn’t follow what a traditional essay might look like. Indeed, this book does not sugarcoat. In many ways it reflects the situation in the Arab world today — resilience against a very real backdrop of tragedy and hopelessness.

I was also surprised by the extent to which I was emotionally invested in the book and the women’s stories.

I constantly felt guilty that I wasn’t doing enough, that I was living in privilege, editing these essays from the comfort of my home in North London while these women and millions of others in the region struggle with harrowing daily realities.

EYE: What did you find drives these women to continually face the sexism, violence, etc.?

ZAHRA:  I would note it’s the desire to share and disseminate the truth that drives several of the women in the book. They have a profound understanding of how and why women are treated in the way that they are in their respective societies, and they fight misogyny by breaking into spaces they may not be welcome or expected in.

EYE: Is there a pattern among these women journalists in what they want to achieve and how they do it?

ZAHRA: I will say that the women were all unflinchingly committed to the act of journalism and the art of news gathering. Their tenacity, resourcefulness and resilience jump off the pages.

Perhaps this tenacity is best captured and expressed by Sudanese journalist and columnist Shamael el Noor, who never once doubts or reconsiders her career path, despite enduring grave challenges and constant threats to her safety.

She speaks poetically of journalism, not only as a profession, but as a way of life:

“I didn’t fully understand the value of my choices until after I faced all this danger and harassment—from the state, from tribesmen, and from Islamists. I have been a journalist for a decade now, and let me tell you what I have learned: this is what journalism should be, or else it shouldn’t be, at all.

Though these experiences have had high prices, they haven’t weakened or deterred me. I have no other option but to move forward, like the many brave journalists who face persecution. This is our destiny, and we remain ever devoted to it.’

EYE: Are there people/places these women can access that their male counterparts cannot?

Amira Al-Sharif | Zahra Hankir | The Women's Eye

Amira Al-Sharif

ZAHRA: Women-dominated spaces and women-focused stories. For example, Amira Al-Sharif, a Yemeni photojournalist, enters the private homes of Yemeni women whose husbands and sons were lost to or engaged in war, to tell us stories of their strength and resilience.

Heba Shibani, a Libyan broadcast journalist, turns her attention to women’s rights by hosting a show that tackled major issues including the inability of Libyan women to pass their nationality on to their children.

EYE: CNN’s chief international anchor Christiane Amanpour said these women journalists “live and work in unrest and oppression.” How do they become journalists to begin with?

ZAHRA: These women were resourceful in overcoming many different challenges.These included having to contend with families that opposed their career choices, sexist and misogynist workplaces, and threats of detention and arrest by the state.

In some cases they persisted with their ambitions behind their parents’ backs. Amira Al-Sharif, snuck into local souks to take photos of Yemenis and documented university protests behind her father’s back.

She eventually won her family’s trust by persuading them, through her work, that this was a noble and necessary profession, and indeed the only one she wanted to pursue.

Egyptian journalist Eman Helal hid her bloodied clothing from her family after covering the fallout from the uprisings in Egypt. And she fought against the patriarchy by using her camera as a tool against sexual harassers. These are just two of a sea of examples.

Ramsis metro station where incidents of sexual harassment have been reported. Women usually prefer to use the ladies metro cars for fear of being harassed in the crowded cars. Photo: Eman Helal | Zahra Hankir | The Women's Eye

Ramsis metro station where incidents of sexual harassment have been reported. Women usually prefer to use the ladies metro cars for fear of being harassed in the crowded cars. Photo: Eman Helal

EYE: What was your biggest challenge in editing this anthology?

ZAHRA: Ensuring an accurate portrayal of the region by diversifying the contributors to the best of my ability. Given space constraints, and the fact that we were dealing with a region of more than 400 million containing 22 countries, this was a somewhat impossible task to begin with.

I also wanted to include a range of time periods covered to give readers a broader perspective on political and social history, rather than just the Arab Spring.

While I’m pleased with how the book has turned out, I understand there are stories and conflicts and countries that were excluded. This is something I definitely lost sleep over, even though in some ways it was out of my control.

EYE: Did you always want a journalism career from a young age?

ZAHRA: Yes! I grew up in the United Kingdom, where I was born, to Lebanese parents who had left the country during a drawn out and devastating civil war. My parents constantly watched the news to follow up on what was unraveling in their — our — home country.

Landlines were frequently down, so they weren’t able to regularly speak to their families to stay abreast of the dire situation. And so I grew up thinking of journalists as heroes, portals into another world who had the power to disseminate otherwise inaccessible information and who could shed light on faraway lands and complicated conflicts.

Zahra, her father and siblings /Photo provided by Zahra Hankir

Zahra, her father and siblings /Photo provided by Zahra Hankir

I was fascinated by information gathering and dissemination and the idea that the pursuit of truth and its reflection could be a profession. My obsession with journalism and the Arab world persisted over the years, and I would say it culminated in this book.

EYE: What do you look for in a story before you commit to it?

ZAHRA: Tension, growth and/or change.

Zahra Hankir

Zahra

EYE: Do you have advice for new journalists?

ZAHRA: If you have a passion or a specific interest, then by all means, chase it, so long as you’re committed to upholding the highest journalistic standards. As a student at Columbia University, I was mentored by the late and great David Klatell.

I was hesitant when I pitched to him the subject for my thesis — private Islamic schooling in NYC — as I worried that I may appear biased or partial to covering my own community.

He encouraged me to write and report the story, and to not shy away from covering my community, people, home country or region, so long as I remained committed to reporting and writing ethically. It was priceless advice that has formed the backbone of my career.

EYE: What do you want the reader to take away from these essays?

ZAHRA: I hope readers will come away from Our Women on the Ground with a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the Middle East, and also that they will look more closely at who’s telling the stories of its countries and people, as well as seek out more diverse and specifically women’s voices.

Ultimately I hope readers will recognize the work that these women are doing as crucial to our full understanding of the Arab world, and celebrate them.

EYE: Finally, what is next for you?

ZAHRA: While more and more Arab women are being heard in this space, and more news rooms are employing and supporting locals, I believe there’s much more to be done.

I’m passionate about amplifying the voices of Arab women and Arabs in general, and in advocating for more diverse newsrooms and more inclusive narratives, and so I hope to embark on another project in this area. I’m just not yet sure what format it will take.

EYE: Thank you, Zahra, for your time and for your introductions to these journalists who are bringing real events of the Arab and Mideastern countries to the world. Continued success to you!

Social Media:

Instagram @zahrahankir

Twitter: @zahrahankir

Facebook: @zahrahankir

Twitter: @penguinrandomhouse

TWE RADIO: New Talk Show Host Mel Robbins On Curing Anxiety and Conquering TV

Mel Robbins

Mel Robbins

Stacey Gualandi

Stacey Gualandi

By Stacey Gualandi/Sept. 12, 2019

Whatever you do, DON’T miss a BRAND NEW episode of The Women’s Eye podcast! Stacey Gualandi interviews Mel Robbins, the author, motivational speaker and – starting September 16th – host of her first daytime TV talk show, The Mel Robbins Show!

Mel Robbins’ international bestseller The 5 Second Rule: Transform Your Life, Work and Confidence with Everyday Courage is a certified self-publishing sensation.

Her Tedx talk How to Stop Screwing Yourself Over below has surpassed 20 million views.

And her personal appearances have not only motivated millions but also made her one of the most sought-after speakers in the country.

Mel Robbins and Stacey, MORE Convention. 2011

Mel Robbins and Stacey, MORE Convention. 2011

Side-note: I first met Mel Robbins in 2011 while covering the More Reinvention Convention for TWE. Since then, I’ve always wanted to interview her.

Three months ago, I picked up her 5 Second Rule after dealing with some health issues, and then out-of-the-blue, I got to interview her!

But Robbins says it’s not a crazy coincidence: “It’s meant to be. People show up in your life when you’re ready to hear it.”

Robbin’s knows-of-what-she-speaks.

The married mother of three and former criminal lawyer-turned-entrepreneur admits her life is a mess-to-success story. “I’m not an expert. I’m a life-tested survivor,” she says. “I’m good at getting out of jams.”

Robbins says she hit rock bottom almost 11 years ago. She was unemployed, facing bankruptcy and suffered from debilitating anxiety. “I wasn’t good at liking myself.” But one day she decided on a new approach to getting up in the morning.

“I counted out loud 5-4-3-2-1 and then sat up,” says Robbins. “That was the moment that changed my life. It is the power of a decision; you are literally one decision from a totally different life.”

Now life is taking her in a totally new direction: daytime television. Robbins conquered the airwaves with a popular radio show and worked as a CNN contributor, but admits TV is a whole new animal.

While she jokes she doesn’t know how to do a talk show, Robbins says success will come by “being myself and making an impact.”

Tune in to our chat to learn how Robbins cures anxiety; what is a “mindset/reset”; why she dedicates herself to helping others (“I know what it feels like to feel alone, isolated and start to lose hope. I don’t want anyone to feel that way”); and what she expects from her new talk show.

“I hope it is a daily destination for empowering, actionable advice and perspective change that you can put into your own life that helps you take control,” says Robbins.

“I want you to identify patterns that no longer work for you and replace them. That’s when life changes.”

The Mel Robbins Show debuts Monday, September 16th! For more information, go to www.melrobbins.com and check your local listings.

Social Media

@melrobbins – Facebook

@melrobbins – Twitter

@melrobbins – Instagram

www.melrobbins.com/tv/

###

 

 

 

TWE PODCAST: Catherine Anaya Talks Empowering Women with Mesha Davis and Love and Money with Catherine Scrivano

Catherine Scrivano, Catherine Anaya, and Mesha Davis at CoHoots, Az

Catherine Scrivano, Catherine Anaya, and Mesha Davis at CoHoots, Az

By Catherine Anaya/September 4, 2019

Don’t miss a BRAND NEW episode of The Women’s Eye podcast with Catherine Anaya as I talk with Mesha Davis, CEO of the Arizona Foundation for Women, a nonprofit that serves as a key resource with a long history of effectively advocating on behalf of women.

I attended their 2019 Awards Luncheon and was impressed by their inclusion and celebration of men who support and advocate for women.

Mesha Davis

Mesha Davis

I talk with Mesha about why she believes men should be part of the solution when it comes to an equitable and just future where women are safe, healthy and economically independent.

Mesha also tells me about her nearly 20 years of nonprofit work with advice for those wanting to get involved or start their own nonprofit.

Mesha Davis at a TeamUSA event

Mesha Davis at a TeamUSA event

Plus, she talks about her childhood and how two important women in her life – her grandmother and her mother – shaped the strong, independent woman she’s become.

Also on this TWE podcast, you’ll meet a regular contributor to The Women’s Eye, Catherine Scrivano.

Catherines Scrivano and Anaya

Catherines Scrivano and Anaya

Catherine is President of CASCO Financial Group in Phoenix, Arizona. She founded her business to help people create the financial strength necessary for achieving their dreams and building money power.

In this episode she talks about relationships and money and why couples fight more about money than anything else.

Plus, she offers practical advice for how they can begin discussing individual money styles and an approach to their finances as a team.

For more information about Mesha, check out:
https://www.azfw.org/
@azfoundationwomen– Instagram
@Arizonafoundationforwomen – Facebook
@SHEcounts – Twitter

For Catherine Scrivano:

CASCO Financial Group 
catherine scrivano
@CatherineScrivano – Facebook

 

TWE PODCAST: Catherine Anaya Talks Breaking Barriers with Julie Giese and Money Planning with Catherine Scrivano

Catherine Scrivano, Julie Giese, and Catherine Anaya

Catherine Scrivano, Julie Giese, and Catherine Anaya

By Catherine Anaya/August 29, 2019

Don’t miss a BRAND NEW episode of The Women’s Eye podcast with Catherine Anaya as I talk with Julie Giese, President of International Speedway Corporation’s ISM Raceway.

Julie oversees promotion and operation of the newly renovated motorsport track in Avondale, Arizona, just outside Phoenix.

She is the only woman president of any of the thirteen ISC tracks which include the Daytona International Speedway and the Watkins Glen International.

I heard Julie speak at a reception in her honor shortly after she was promoted to ISM Raceway President in the fall of 2018. I was very impressed with her career and passion for mentoring women.

Julie Giese at Can-Am 500

Julie Giese at Can-Am 500

Julie shares with me how she grew up a racing fan on a dairy farm in Wisconsin and how she worked her way into and up the ladder of the motorsports industry.

She is the force behind the design and project management of ISM Raceway’s recent $178 million dollar renovation.

Julie talks about the challenges she faced in both areas. Julie also recognizes her role as a changemaker and offers some important perspective on why mentoring other women is so important to her and the advice she likes to share.

Plus, you’ll learn why her visits back home still include chores on the farm.

Catherines Scrivano Anaya recording podcast at CoHoots, Phoenix, Az.

Catherines Scrivano Anaya recording podcast at CoHoots, Phoenix, Az.

Also in this TWE podcast, you’ll meet a new, regular contributor to The Women’s Eye podcast, Catherine Scrivano.

Catherine is President of CASCO Financial Group in Phoenix, Arizona. She founded her business to help people create the financial strength necessary for achieving their dreams and Building Money Power.

In this episode, Catherine talks about saving versus investing, the difference between the two and some simple ways to begin saving money now.

As Catherine says, “You don’t have to be wealthy to be wise.”  And as far as investing, she advises to start yesterday!

For more information about ISM Raceway, check out:

www.ismraceway.com
@ismraceway – Instagram
@ismraceway – Facebook
@ismraceway – Twitter

For Catherine Scrivano:

CASCO Financial Group website
@CatherineScrivano -Facebook
CASCO Financial – Twitter
Catherine Scrivano – Linked In

TWE PODCAST: Host Catherine Anaya Talks PTSD with Pat Bondurant and Money Freedom with Catherine Scrivano

Catherine Anaya, Pat Bondurant and Catherine Scrivano

Catherine Anaya, Pat Bondurant and Catherine Scrivano

Don’t miss a BRAND NEW episode of The Women’s Eye podcast with Catherine Anaya as I talk with Pat Bondurant, respected philanthropist, PTSD awareness advocate and former CEO/President of the Bondurant Racing School in Chandler, Arizona.

I’ve known Pat for several years through various charity circles and was intrigued not only by her interest in creating PTSD awareness but her nearly decade-long marriage to champion race car driver Bob Bondurant.

Pat and husband Bob Bondurant

Pat and husband Bob Bondurant

Pat shares the fun story of how she and Bob met at an automobile auction in Scottsdale, Arizona and how her daughter encouraged her to give the racing legend a chance.

Bob and Pat Bondurant

Bob and Pat Bondurant

Many people are familiar with Pat’s philanthropic work raising millions of dollars on behalf of hundreds of different charities.

But she’s also had successful careers as a draft/engineer for the first Space Shuttle and as a lead architect designer for the Tomahawk Cruise Missile Facility.

She talks about how she thrived in what were considered male-dominated industries and her advice for young women entering STEM-related fields.

Plus, Pat will talk about her passion for creating PTSD awareness, how you can get involved and how the Birdwell Foundation comes to the aid of people suffering from the disease.

Also in this episode, you’ll meet a new, regular contributor to The Women’s Eye podcast, Catherine Scrivano. Catherine is President of CASCO Financial Group in Phoenix, Arizona. She founded her business to help people create the financial strength necessary for achieving their dreams and Building Money Power.

Catherine Scrivano and Catherine Anaya

Catherine Scrivano and Catherine

Catherine talks about three reasons why she believes it’s now more important than ever for women to claim their money power…

Plus, you’ll hear how financial freedom can change a woman’s life.

For more information about The Birdwell Foundation, check out:
www.birdwellfoundation.org
@birdwellfndn – Facebook

###

TWE INTERVIEW: How Nancy Rivard’s Airline Ambasssadors Is Making a Global Impact

Nancy Rivard speaking at an international conference/Photo: shfwire.com

Nancy Rivard speaking at an international conference/Photo: shfwire.com

By Wendy Verlaine/August 15, 2019

Photos Courtesy AAI

Nancy Rivard may be one of the most influential and dedicated activists for human rights and charitable giving in the airline and hospitality industry. She is shining the spotlight on human trafficking, the fastest growing criminal industry in the world today, producing over $150 billion annually, according to the Department of State.

“I said, ‘How am I to create change in the largest industry in the world?’ My inner voice just said stop talking about it, start doing it. I will do one thing a month that directly helps a child.”  Nancy Rivard

Today Rivard is founder of Airline Ambassadors International, AAI, a non profit organization committed to fighting human trafficking and educating the airline and hospitality industry to the signs and prevention of this activity.

AAI volunteers have hand-delivered $70 million in aid to needy children and families all around the world.

AAI has also helped establish medical clinics and volunteer medical escort aid that transports patients in need to the US for treatment.

I was fortunate to catch up with this dedicated changemaker and ask her how she discovered her life’s purpose, how uncertainty did not deter her and how she successfully influenced and affected so many people on a global level…

[Read more…]

TWE PODCAST: Catherine Anaya Talks Healthy Mindset with Felicia Romero and Money Power with Catherine Scrivano

Felicia Romero, Catherine Anaya, Catherine Scrivano for TWE

Catherine Anaya (c) with Felicia Romero (l) and Catherine Scrivano (r)

By Catherine Anaya, July 24, 2019

Don’t miss a BRAND NEW episode of The Women’s Eye Podcast with Catherine Anaya as I talk with Felicia Romero – fitness coach, speaker, 8-time fitness cover model and host of the Diet Dropout Podcast.

I’ve had the pleasure of interviewing Felicia on television about fitness and nutrition but this is the first time we’ve had the chance to have an in-depth conversation of our mutual struggles with bulimia and body dysmorphic disorder.

Felicia Romero, fitness coach, speaker, 9 time fitness cover model, host of The Diet Dropout Podcast

Fitness coach Felicia Romero

Felicia talks about her relationship with food and her body and how her attitude shifted when she became a professional fitness competitor. The scale and the gym began to control her life, leading to health setbacks that served as a wake-up call for her.

Today Felicia is at her healthiest from the inside out. She talks about how she developed a healthier attitude toward food, fitness, her body and her mental health.

She also provides some tips for navigating potential triggers on social media and how we as parents can raise our children to develop healthy relationships with food, their bodies and their overall health.

Plus, you’ll learn how Felicia is inspiring others with her authentic posts on social media, her online coaching and her own podcast, the Diet Dropout.

Catherine Scrivano Catherine Anaya for The Women's Eye

Catherine Scrivano and Catherine Anaya recording podcast

Also in this episode, you’ll meet a new, regular contributor to The Women’s Eye Podcast, Catherine Scrivano. Catherine is President of CASCO Financial Group in Phoenix, Arizona.

She founded her business to help people create the financial strength necessary for achieving their dreams and Building Money Power as we call her segment.

She shares how being raised by a single mother helped shape her passion for teaching women how to create their own financial empowerment…plus, her thoughts on why people fear money; how you can begin to achieve financial security; and why she believes you don’t have to be wealthy to be wise.

For more information about Felicia, check out:

www.feliciaromero.com
@feliciaromero – Instagram
@feliciaromeroonline – Facebook
@feliciaromero – Twitter

For more information about Catherine, check out:

www.cascofinancial.com
@catherinescrivano – LinkedIn
@catherinescrivano / @cascofinancialgroup – Facebook
@cascofinancial – Twitter